CLINICAL CASE : Brain abscess secondary to a dental infection in an 11 year old child

A primary molar dental abscess was implicated as the cause of a brain abscess in an 11-year-old boy. 

This case report describes the neurological signs and symptoms, and acute management of a brain abscess in a child. 

dental-infection

A brain abscess is provisionally diagnosed from the patient’s medical history, as well as the presence of signs and symptoms such as fever, headache, nausea, vomiting, focal neurological deficit, altered mentation, speech alterations, papillary edema, and neck stiffness or seizures. 

A definitive diagnosis of brain abscess is confirmed through imaging. The dental source of infection is identified by the exclusion of more probable foci such as the ears, heart, lungs, eyes or sinuses. 

Introduction : Dental abscesses and facial cellulitis put dentists on alert for potentially life-threatening conditions such as sepsis or airway obstruction, but the risk of a brain abscess is a complication of odontogenic infection that dentists rarely consider. 


This report describes the case of an 11-year-old boy whose brain abscess and associated neurological signs were most likely attributable to an abscessed primary molar. 

The description of the neurological signs and symptoms, and the history and management of this case will inform dentists about the real possibility of a brain abscess of dental origin. 




°jcda.ca 
°Canadian Dental Association 
°Dr. Hibberd / Dr. Nguyen